Trust and all that jazz

“Trust v.  confidence; a reliance or resting of the mind on the integrity, veracity, justice, friendship or another sound principle of the other person”

I have my Christian upbringing to thank for the multiple verses that come to mind when I think of trusting God.

Psalm 37:3 Trust in the LORD and do good. Then you will live safely in the land and prosper.

Isaiah 26:3 You will keep in perfect peace those whose minds are steadfast, because they trust in you.

Proverbs 3: 5-6 Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight

But do I really trust Him? I’ll admit, sometimes the extent of my trust when I go to him for daily needs in prayer is a simple, “Yeah I think he’s going to come through.”

I’ll liken it to this situation:

Sort of like when you’re in a group project in school, and there’s that one (or maybe few) group members who you aren’t quite so sure will actually pick up their part of the load.

And then you entertain thoughts of doing the entire project on your on, you might have even already started a presentation, took notes on parts that were not your own… then you realize that hijacking the group project is not the wisest decision,

You throw your (proverbial) hands in air and say with a forced sigh, “Yeah I think they’re going to come through”

“I guess I have to trust them”

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Now think of a close friend. One you know will drop anything and will be there in a moment’s notice to help you figure out a problem.

What’s the trust level there? You know they will be there. You have confidence they will, and they want to. And they only have your best interests in mind.

We are being challenged to trust Jesus- to absolutely take Him at his word- to go when he says go, to stay when he says stay. Oh! May I learn more of the love of Jesus by trusting Him at his word.

Oh, to walk with Jesus more like a cherished friend than a distant acquaintance; than a far off voice in the wind. Do I know Him? Do I truly trust him?

 

Dusty, I’m Locked Out of The House

House-sit, it will be good they say.

House-sit, the puppy is cute they say.

So, off I go to my first house-sitting gig…

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I’m currently sitting on the front porch of an almost stranger’s home (I still have not met these people….I was recommended and came after they left for the trip). Currently, conniving about the ways I may break into the house.

1.Jump Through the Kitchen Window

2.Call a Locksmith

3.Cry

I run to the back door. “Aha!”

Nope. No luck. I locked that one too. 

Dusty, the sweetest golden retriever, meets me at the locked glass door. Her puppy dog eyes stare at me with a quizzical look. She puts a paw upon the glass, I meet it with my palm… Sorry, buddy.

Ok, maybe that’s too dramatic— she does have practically a mansion to run around in there— but still— she must have been thinking, “Why you so dumb, housesitter?”

(Just if you were wondering, puppy went on a walk, had breakfast and lots of outside time before author inadvertently locked her in)

I swallow my pride.

I email the owners— spare key, anyone?

They’re probably up over some continent I’ve never even been too… Their last concern, would be me–currently panicking.

I email my stats professor— 

I’m not going to class today, Prof. 

P.S. Do you know how to pick a lock?

Panicked, 

Deborah

5 hours later:

I put down my bobby pins, paper clips and step away from the door.

(I actually did end up going to class; with the hopes of someone teaching me how to pick a lock— but to no avail)

The family’s family friend (how’s that for confusing?) becomes my new favorite person and shows up with a spare. 

And within minutes, my whole day’s worry disappears. 

Dusty comes up and greets me, probably wanting to say, “What took you so long?”

Whatever, dog. You stick to your puppy dog looks, and I’ll stick to… not locking myself out of strangers’ homes.

3 Important things I learned in my Human Anatomy Class (besides, you know, Anatomy)

Ah, the dreaded prerequisite: Human Anatomy.

 

Things I Learned about myself in Anatomy:

1. (most times) Studying in groups doesn’t work for me

Oh, how I wish this wasn’t true. I’d been homeschooled for K-12 and used to independent learning and having my own space to process everything — that obviously wasn’t going to change overnight. College has this great allure to an extrovert like me– so many people– so many great friendships to be cultivated– but that needs to be balanced with some kick-butt studying if you wanna get the grades, and most importantly, know your stuff.

2. Negative attitudes help no one, ever

Misery seeks company. Hard test headed your way? Yes, whining a little bit with some buds is good– maybe therapeutic, even. But too much of those negative vibes can even get the best students down.

Si se puede, girl!

3. Medical Terminology is a whole new language, yo!

Unless you pick up foreign languages like nobody’s business, then… yes, there will be a learning curve. I remember my first Spanish 101 class. It was hard. But the more I used it, the more I practiced, the better I got– (at Spanish, and at terminology)

 

 

 

 

 

Statistics over the Summer…

So Intro to Statistics is my last class (and only summer course)  at Mira Costa College (before heading to Grand Canyon University– it also counts as a requisite for their Nursing Program, so I hit 2 birds with one stone.

I have about a week and half left ’til Stats ends (2 more tests and a final).. other than it being a M-Th class during summer– it has been– I never thought I’d be saying this– but actually pretty fun. That is in large part due to the Professor– he uses thinks out of the box to apply stats to the world around us (think: dating relationships, amount of money earned with every degree you earn, IQ scores, recent presidential elections polling) Reading the book is a must, but we use Statistics for Psychology, 6th Edition 6th Edition by Arthur Aron Ph.D., Elaine N. Aron Ph.D., Elliot Coups Ph.D. and it’s not bad at all— I feel like the book is understandable and uses”normal-speak” (which according to our Prof is used at UC Berkeley and Cal State San Marcos… he also on occasion uses tests from those institutions… and the whole class does really well on those. In fact, those are the “easy tests” his own tests are much more difficult– this means we really know our stuff).

Yes it is a math class, but not more math than you’d encounter in Algebra 2 (so square roots, multiplication, rounding to 10ths and 100ths, division). Not scary at all.

The challenge is learning the concepts (so critical thinking) and drawing conclusions by doing the Math. Definitions and understanding the concepts is key. A lot of the math so far has been bookkeeping…

Stats will definitely change the way you view the world (not an exaggeration) and my little knowledge of it has actually made me very interested in world of nursing research!